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Quotes, aphorisms, famous sentences

In these pages you can find a collection of 8295 quotes and aphorisms. You can search for a specific word using the form below, or surf among the categories. If you find errors, please let me know! Have fun!

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Fashion (7)

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In the normal mode of discovery, even resistance to change has a use that will be explored more fully in the next section. By ensuring that the paradigm will not be too easily surrendered, resistance guarantees that scientists will not be lightly distracted and that the anomalies that lead to paradigm change will penetrate existing knowledge to the core. The very fact that a significant scientific novelty so often emerges simultaneously from several laboratories is an index both to the strongly traditional nature of normal science and to the completeness with which that traditional pursuit prepare the completeness with which that traditional pursuit prepares the away for its own change. (Thomas Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Pg. 65)
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This notion of species as 'natural kinds' fits splendidly with creationist tenets of a pre-Darwinian age. Louis Agassiz, even argued that species are God's individual thoughts, made incarnate so that we might perceive both His majesty and His message. Species, Agassiz wrote, are instituted by Divine Intelligence as the categories of His mode of thinking. But how could a division of the organic world into discrete entities be justified by an evolutionary theory that proclaimed ceaseless change as the fundamental fact of nature? (Stephen Jay Gould, Professor of Geology and Paleontology, Harvard University), 'A quahog is a quahog', Natural History vol LXXXVIII(7), August-September, 1979, pg. 18)
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Following Derringer’s advice he had traveled [through time] naked- ‘‘the one costume common to all ages,’’ the scientist had boomed. - Anthony Boucher, ‘‘The Barrier’’ (1942)
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I pray for one last landing On the globe that gave me birth; Letmerestmy eyesonthe.eecyskies Andthecool,greenhillsof Earth. Letthesweetfreshbreezeshealme As they rove around the girth Of our lovely mother planet, Of the cool, green hills of Earth. We’vetriedeachspinningspacemote Andreckoneditstrue worth: Take us back again to the homes of men On the cool, green hills of Earth. The arching sky is calling Spacemen back to their trade. All hands! Stand by! Free falling! Andthelightsbelowusfade. Outridethesonsof Terra, Far drives the thundering jet, Upleapstheraceof Earthmen Out,far,andonwardyet-
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It crawled out of the darkness and hot damp mold into the cool of a morning. It was huge. It was lumped and crusted with its own hateful substances, and pieces of it dropped o. as it went its way, dropped o. and lay writhing, and stilled, and sank putrescent into the forest loam. - Theodore Sturgeon, ‘‘It’’ (1940)
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A revealing way of describing science .ction is to say that it is part of a liter­ary mode which one may call ‘‘fabril.’’ ‘‘Fabril’’ is the opposite of ‘‘pastoral.’’ [. . .] Pastoral literature is rural, nostalgic, conservative. It idealizes the past and tends to convert complexities into simplicity; its central image is the shepherd. Fabril literature (of which science .ction is now by far the most prominent genre) is overwhelmingly urban, disruptive, future-oriented, eager for novelty; its central image is the ‘‘faber,’’ the smith or blacksmith in older usage, but now extended in science .ction to mean the creator of artefacts in general- metallic, crystalline, genetic, or even social. - Tom Shippey, introduction to The Oxford Book of Science Fiction (1992)
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A few moments earlier the water had seemed cool and inviting, but now had become a closed world, the barrier of the surface like a plane between two dimensions. - J. G. Ballard, The Drowned World (1962)
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